OPD TIMING FOR WEEKDAYS FROM 9 AM TO 5 PM

BLK
BLK
BLK
enquiry
X

Enquiry

Please fill in the details for us to get in touch with you.

number1800-121-3422
department-banner

Nuclear Medicine

Nuclear Medicine

Equipped with state-of-the-art equipment, we are committed to providing high quality clinical service while adhering to the best practices in radiation protection and patient safety. The department boasts of the most advanced third generation Time of Flight PET CT.

  • Hospital Specialities
  • HIDA Scan
  • SPECT Scan
  • Diagnostic

The Department of Nuclear Medicine offers a comprehensive range of clinical services in radioisotope imaging and therapy. 

The tracer is handled by the liver like bile. Bile is a fluid produced and excreted by your liver that helps your digestive system break down fats in the foods you eat. Bile is stored in your gallbladder and the gallbladder releases the bile when you eat a meal.

A special nuclear medicine scanner (gamma camera) tracks the flow of the tracer from your liver into your gallbladder and small intestine.

The name HIDA comes from an early tracer used for the scan, hydroxy iminodiacetic acid. More effective tracers are used today.

Cholescintigraphy, hepatobiliary scintigraphy are other names for a HIDA scan.

A single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) scan lets your doctor analyze the function of some of your internal organs. A SPECT scan is a type of nuclear imaging test, which means it uses a radioactive substance and a special camera to create 3-D pictures.

Your doctor analyzes the results of your SPECT scan. Pictures from your scan may show colors that tell your doctor what areas of your body absorbed more of the radioactive tracer and which areas absorbed less. For instance, a brain SPECT image might show a lighter color where brain cells are less active and darker colors where brains cells are more active. Some SPECT images show shades of gray, rather than colors.

Our Doctors